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ichLinks
Discover inspirational cultural heritage in museums, galleries, libraries and archives in ichLinks
Welcome to
ichLinks
Discover inspirational cultural heritage in museums, galleries, libraries and archives in ichLinks
Welcome to
ichLinks
Discover inspirational cultural heritage in museums, galleries, libraries and archives in ichLinks
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“Orteke—Traditional Kazakh Puppet-Musical Performing Art”

ICH VIDEO PRODUCTION IN THE ASIA PACIFIC REGION: CENTRAL ASIA KAZAKHSTAN

Some people say orteke is a street theatre, others might claim it is a musical instrument, some would see it as a decorative art, and children perceive it as a toy and use for entertainment. The truth is that all of the statements are correct, orteke is everything altogether. It is an indigenous Kazakh performing art that combines theater, music, and puppetry. You may notice it from the introductory words of one of the masters in the video. He did not give single-worded description of orteke, because it is simply impossible.

ICH Archive

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Folk games

Games are those forms of individual or team competition, played to a decision according to agreed upon rules. They are voluntary and nonproductive and are played outside everyday reality, in their own territories by their own characters. Uzbek folk games, in terms of features, prevalent in them, are classified as follows: • Hunting games (Gang, Jambil, Lappak, Oshiq, Khappak, Chirgizak) • Shepherds' games (Tuptosh, Kotarma tosh, Echki oyin, Chopon va shoqol, Qadama tayoq, Chillik, Podachi, Chanta, Chuv-chuv, etc.) • Games associated with crafts (Dandarak, Charkhpalak, Besh barmoq, Paqilloq, Lanka, Chighiriq, Uzuk soldi, Varrak, Sartarosh, Koz boghlar, etc.) • Games associated with agriculture (Palakhmon, Jon burgam, Somon sepdi, Chanoq oyin, Shaftoli shaker, Qoriqchi, etc.) • Imitation games (Khola-khola, Topaloq, Kim oladi-yo, Ayiq oyin, Khoroz urushtirish, Oqsoq turna, Bosari, Asalari, Ghozlar, etc.) • Action games (Chunka shuvoq, Chim otish, Kim tex, Hurkach, Tufaloq, Chori chambar, Mushuk-sichqon, Yoghoch oyoq, Durra olish, Khalinchak, etc.) • Word games (Kim chaqqon, Bolkon-bolkon, Botmon-botmon, Juftmi-toq, Oq quyonim alomat, Oq terakmi, kok terak, Pirr etdi, etc.) • Games played during get-togethers (Gap-gashtak, Topik oyin, Podsho-vazir, Podsho-oghri, Arshi alo, etc.) • Folk wrestling and the games associated with it (Milliy kurash, Polvonbozlik, Yelkada kurash, Bel olish kurashi, etc.) • Riders' games (Chavgon, Uloq-kopkari, Piyoda poyga, Oltin qoboq, Shoghuloq, Qiz quvish, Eshak mindi, etc.)

Nawrouz, Novruz, Nowrouz, Nowrouz, Nawrouz, Nauryz, Nooruz, Nowruz, Navruz, Nevruz, Nowruz, Navruz

It is the New Year by solar calendar in Central, South and South-West Asia countries. According to sources, Navruz was one of the biggest festivities among Iranian and Turkic peoples. Mahmud al-Kashgari in his work called "Diwanu l-Lugat al-Turk" mentions about many folk songs, which were dedicated to Navruz. Also, the information about Navruz festivity can be found in such works as "The remaining traces of past centuries" (written by Abu Rayhan al-Biruni), "Navruzname" (by Omar Khayyam), and those written by Alisher Navoi, Zahir-ud-Din Muhammad Babur and other scholars. In the territory of Central Asia Navruz festivity was associated with the beginning of the New Year. As such, the preparations for it began several days ahead. Wheat was germinated and from its sprouts sumalak was cooked, dumplings with greens and samosas with mint were prepared. Also folk games were organized (such as horseracing, uloq, kurash, etc.), promenades were arranged, songs about spring were sung, terma and dostons were performed (by bakhshis). On the first day of Navruz children, living in rural areas, gathered in groups and sang songs dedicated to Navruz before the doors of houses. And the owner of the house, hearing these songs, came out, gave presents to children, and treated them with food. In their turn, children distributed one part of the food among widows and orphans living in the village. All these traditions and customs are still alive.

Congratulatory Videos

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President MACPA Congratulations
Kazakhstan Congratulations

ICH News

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The 1st ichLinks Executive Committee Meeting
The 1st ichLinks Executive Committee Meeting was held on June 29, 2021, online. Representatives of the current partner organizations from five countries (Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam) and future partners from four countries (Bhutan, Cambodia, Fiji, and Singapore) were present. During this 1st meeting, the Committee discussed draft Project Guidelines and the Operational Rules of ichLinks Executive Committee, elected the first Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson, and shared the progress reports on the status of the first ichLinks supported projects of Mongolia, Malaysia, Kazakhstan, and Vietnam. The Committee also discussed the provisional agenda for the 2nd Committee meeting as well as the working-level meeting. Mr. Rustam Muzafarov (Deputy Chairman, National Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Kazakhstan) and Mr. Bui Hoai Son (Director, Vietnam National Institute of Culture and Arts Studies) were elected as the first Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson respectively. Their term of office is one year, which is until June 28, 2022. ICHCAP will additionally collect opinions from partner organizations on the Project Guidelines and Operational Rules of the Executive Committee and will discuss them at the 2nd Committee meeting at the end of this year. In addition, by holding a working-level meeting in August, ICHCAP plans to conduct technical training and provide manuals to partner organizations so they can directly upload their ICH data to the ichLinks platform. The current ICH data of partner organizations uploaded to date can be found in the archives of the ichLinks.

06/30/2021